Month: June 2016

How Biathletes and Hunters Calm their Breathing After Running

 

What do hunters and biathletes have in common? Well, they all do long rounds of cardio while shooting in between. A biathlon usually consists of the athlete skiing across a country trail with the total distance disrupted with four shooting rounds. The first two shooting rounds in a prone position while the other two is in standing position. Those who have tried this even at the amateur level knows the difficulty in trying to calm your nerves in order to shoot and hit your target.

Hunters on the other hand, have to do long distance walking and running after their game and shooting as the opportunity arises. This too presents a level of difficulty in acquiring, shooting and actually hitting your target. Not even the best archery sight with the best bow reviews can help you in hitting your target in this kind of scenario. So how do they calm their nerves after running or walking or skating?

Calming your breathing and consequently calming your nerves is both an art and a science. Elite biathletes and hunters can calm themselves down by lowering their heart rates seconds after they stop and acquire their targets. Here are the techniques that they employ:

  1. Have a steady composure—They tend to remain calm even in every stressful situation. They make it a point to practice a calm composure throughout the day rather than to calm themselves down in haste during the competition.
  2. Train harder—In order to make the body accustomed to stress, you need to train really hard until calming down your breathing, acquiring your target and consequently hitting it is second nature. You have to remember that the ability to lower your heart rate in seconds is a sign that you are at the top of your health. If you cannot attain this ability, that means that you are not that fit.
  3. Practice deep breathing—This is the key to everything. If you do frequent shallow breaths, then that means you’re panting and consequently, your hands won’t be steady. This is a huge problem among hunters and biathletes. You need to practice deep and consistent breathing in order to calm your nerves.
  4. Have the right mindset—Keep anxiety out! You can’t expect to practice all of the techniques above if you are an anxious person. This is particularly true when training and during the actual competition.

The best way to remain calm is to avoid overthinking about the matter. Give yourself time to relax after you have trained really hard. Both mind and body need a breathing space in order to recuperate and regain its strength.